CIO Cloud Summit | November 6-8, 2016 | Hotel Palomar Phoenix - Phoenix, AZ, USA

↓ Agenda Key

Keynote Presentation

Visionary speaker presents to entire audience on key issues, challenges and business opportunities

Keynote Presentations give attending delegates the opportunity to hear from leading voices in the industry. These presentations feature relevant topics and issues aligned with the speaker's experience and expertise, selected by the speaker in concert with the summit's Content Committee." title="Keynote Presentations give attending delegates the opportunity to hear from leading voices in the industry. These presentations feature relevant topics and issues aligned with the speaker's experience and expertise, selected by the speaker in concert with the summit's Content Committee.

Executive Visions

Panel moderated by Master of Ceremonies and headed by four executives discussing critical business topics

Executive Visions sessions are panel discussions that enable in-depth exchanges on critical business topics. Led by a moderator, these sessions encourage attending executives to address industry challenges and gain insight through interaction with expert panel members." title="Executive Visions sessions are panel discussions that enable in-depth exchanges on critical business topics. Led by a moderator, these sessions encourage attending executives to address industry challenges and gain insight through interaction with expert panel members.

Thought Leadership

Solution provider-led session giving high-level overview of opportunities

Led by an executive from the vendor community, Thought Leadership sessions provide comprehensive overviews of current business concerns, offering strategies and solutions for success. This is a unique opportunity to access the perspective of a leading member of the vendor community." title="Led by an executive from the vendor community, Thought Leadership sessions provide comprehensive overviews of current business concerns, offering strategies and solutions for success. This is a unique opportunity to access the perspective of a leading member of the vendor community.

Think Tank

End user-led session in boardroom style, focusing on best practices

Think Tanks are interactive sessions that place delegates in lively discussion and debate. Sessions admit only 15-20 participants at a time to ensure an intimate environment in which delegates can engage each other and have their voices heard." title="Think Tanks are interactive sessions that place delegates in lively discussion and debate. Sessions admit only 15-20 participants at a time to ensure an intimate environment in which delegates can engage each other and have their voices heard.

Roundtable

Interactive session led by a moderator, focused on industry issue

Led by an industry analyst, expert or a member of the vendor community, Roundtables are open-forum sessions with strategic guidance. Attending delegates gather to collaborate on common issues and challenges within a format that allows them to get things done." title="Led by an industry analyst, expert or a member of the vendor community, Roundtables are open-forum sessions with strategic guidance. Attending delegates gather to collaborate on common issues and challenges within a format that allows them to get things done.

Case Study

Overview of recent project successes and failures

Case Studies allow attending executives to hear compelling stories about implementations and projects, emphasizing best practices and lessons learned. Presentations are immediately followed by Q&A sessions." title="Case Studies allow attending executives to hear compelling stories about implementations and projects, emphasizing best practices and lessons learned. Presentations are immediately followed by Q&A sessions.

Focus Group

Discussion of business drivers within a particular industry area

Focus Groups allow executives to discuss business drivers within particular industry areas. These sessions allow attendees to isolate specific issues and work through them. Presentations last 15-20 minutes and are followed by Q&A sessions." title="Focus Groups allow executives to discuss business drivers within particular industry areas. These sessions allow attendees to isolate specific issues and work through them. Presentations last 15-20 minutes and are followed by Q&A sessions.

Analyst Q&A Session

Moderator-led coverage of the latest industry research

Q&A sessions cover the latest industry research, allowing attendees to gain insight on topics of interest through questions directed to a leading industry analyst." title="Q&A sessions cover the latest industry research, allowing attendees to gain insight on topics of interest through questions directed to a leading industry analyst.

Vendor Showcase

Several brief, pointed overviews of the newest solutions and services

Taking the form of three 10-minute elevator pitches by attending vendors, these sessions provide a concise and pointed overview of the latest solutions and services aligned with attendee needs and preferences." title="Taking the form of three 10-minute elevator pitches by attending vendors, these sessions provide a concise and pointed overview of the latest solutions and services aligned with attendee needs and preferences.

Executive Exchange

Pre-determined, one-on-one interaction revolving around solutions of interest

Executive Exchanges offer one-on-one interaction between executives and vendors. This is an opportunity for both parties to make key business contacts, ask direct questions and get the answers they need. Session content is prearranged and based on mutual interest." title="Executive Exchanges offer one-on-one interaction between executives and vendors. This is an opportunity for both parties to make key business contacts, ask direct questions and get the answers they need. Session content is prearranged and based on mutual interest.

Open Forum Luncheon

Informal discussions on pre-determined topics

Led by a moderator, Open Forum Luncheons offer attendees informal, yet focused discussions on current industry topics and trends over lunch." title="Led by a moderator, Open Forum Luncheons offer attendees informal, yet focused discussions on current industry topics and trends over lunch.

Networking Session

Unique activities at once relaxing, enjoyable and productive

Networking opportunities take various unique forms, merging enjoyable and relaxing activities with an environment conducive to in-depth conversation. These gatherings allow attendees to wind down between sessions and one-on-one meetings, while still furthering discussions and being productive." title="Networking opportunities take various unique forms, merging enjoyable and relaxing activities with an environment conducive to in-depth conversation. These gatherings allow attendees to wind down between sessions and one-on-one meetings, while still furthering discussions and being productive.

 

Sunday, November 6, 2016 - CIO Cloud Summit

3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

Registration & Greeting

 

4:30 pm - 6:00 pm

Exclusive CXO Keynote

Top 10 Competencies of the Modern IT Executive

Communication,” “business acumen,” and “relationship building” are all familiar entries on every “Top IT Leadership Skills” list ever written. While these attributes continue to be important in our current climate of risk, innovation and IT opportunity, they are just a drop in the bucket. In an era where technology belongs to everyone, the technology executive must have so much more. In this newly updated presentation, Martha Heller, an IT executive recruiter and author of The CIO Paradox and Be the Business: CIOs in the New Era of IT (fall 2016) presents a list of new skills critical to any IT leader working today. Drawing on personal interviews with more than 400 successful CIOs, Heller, a master storyteller, offers case studies, anecdotes, advice and impressions to arm attendees with the skills they need to bring their companies into the future.

Presented by:

View detailsMartha Heller, President , Heller Search AssociatesHeller Search Associates

 

6:00 pm - 7:00 pm

Networking Cocktail Reception

 

7:00 pm - 8:30 pm

Networking Dinner

 

8:30 pm - 10:00 pm

After Dinner Networking

 

Monday, November 7, 2016 - CIO Cloud Summit

7:00 am - 7:55 am

Registration and Networking Breakfast

 

8:00 am - 8:10 am

Welcome Address and Opening Remarks

 

8:10 am - 8:50 am

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Keynote Presentation

Becoming A Service-Oriented Enterprise

Many organizations are discovering that adopting service catalogues, curated collections of business and IT services, can both enhance IT-business relationships (by clearly outlining capabilities and expectations as well service costs) and improve operational competency (by standardizing service offerings). Service catalogues are only as useful as their accuracy however and a service catalogue with service levels that cannot be met can in many have a greater negative impact than not having a service catalogue at all. To ensure that service levels are set appropriately it is important to understand the capabilities of the people, processes, and tools that underlie them and this requires measurement up front to eliminate guess work.

Takeaways:

  • Service catalogues have a demonstrated value within enterprises to manage costs, improve service delivery, and enhance relationships
  • As important as service definition is to success, service level definition may be even more so to avoid “over-commit, under-deliver” situations
  • Without good performance metrics, the kind derived from an IT Service Optimization platform, establishing appropriate service levels is nothing more than a shot in the dark with a low probability of success
 

8:55 am - 9:35 am

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Keynote Presentation


Sponsored by:

IBM View details

 
 
 

9:45 am - 10:15 am

Executive Exchange

 

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Think Tank

Using Cloud Delivered Services to Enable Business Transformation

As IT leaders begin to make the Cloud an inherent component of their long-term plans, they face the risk of falling into old habits and simply approaching the Cloud from a purely tech-centric perspective. While addressing the technology questions presented by increased Cloud adoption is important, more important is understanding the business enablement opportunities offered by broader Cloud adoption strategies. Innovative CIOs will need to see the Cloud for what it is; a way to change the conversation and focus away from the bits and bytes to an evaluation of what capability enables optimized business initiatives.

Takeaways:

  • Learn why viewing the Cloud as an alternate technology delivery channel only is career suicide
  • Understand the real value of the Cloud, and that it goes beyond surface metrics like cost savings
  • Develop, instead of a Cloud adoption strategy, a Cloud/Business enablement strategy

Call for Speakers

 

10:20 am - 10:50 am

Executive Exchange

 

Thought Leadership

Public, Private, Hybrid: Understanding the Pros and Cons

When it comes to a move to the cloud, enterprises have three very distinct options available to them (or two distinct options and a third that is the blend of the first two). Public clouds offer the potential of tremendous flexibility and unparalleled efficiency but come with question marks about security and resiliency. Private clouds directly address those concerns but bring far bigger price tags, both in terms of dollar cost and management requirements. On the surface hybrid clouds seem to offer the best of both worlds by marrying the best of public and private, and minimizing their worst. But this isn’t necessarily the case and in many ways hybrid can be seen as nothing more than a compromise solution that compromises all the benefits of the cloud. The key for enterprises when selecting a cloud model is to look at the big picture and build a strategy that leverages strengths, minimizes weaknesses, and is built for the long term.

Takeaways:

  • The promise of the public cloud lies in its flexibility, cost-effectiveness and ease of use but it brings with it a loss of control
  • Private clouds all but guarantee data privacy and protection but carry significantly bigger price tags and negative impacts of accessibility
  • Hybrid clouds allow enterprises to mix and match to get the right cost vs. security balance but ratchet management complexity up to all new levels
 

10:55 am - 11:25 am

Executive Exchange

 

Roundtable

The Evolution of the Private Cloud

Once upon a time applications ran directly on physical hardware. Then the boxes got bigger and more capable and multiple applications were run on the same hardware. There were some resource constraints, but things in general became more efficient. Time passed, things evolved and virtualization was introduced, allowing enterprises to run even more applications even more efficiently on the same hardware. And then the cloud came on the scene, extending the virtualization model to the point that it looked like something completely different, to the point that it became true utility computing. Cloud computing is not just “virtualization on a bigger scale” and as CIOs prepare their organizations to dive into private clouds at an increasing rate, it is very important to understand what they are and are not, and how they differ from their forbear computer models with which we are all familiar.

Takeaways:

  • Private clouds are big and becoming bigger, but calling something a private cloud and having it actually be one are different things
  • While virtualization may be a core enabling technology of a private cloud, virtualizing an environment doesn’t make it a cloud
  • True private clouds have both pros and cons in relation to other compute models; they are not the be-all and end-all and careful consideration needs to be given before pushing ahead with private cloud deployment
 

11:30 am - 12:00 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Roundtable

Planning for a MultiCloud Future

The promise of the cloud is almost beyond compare; infinite computing resources, unmatched reliability and uptime, instantaneous service availability, simplistic self-service and provisioning, and the low-low prices of a “buy by the drink” model. These are the reasons behind the rush to the cloud that we are currently experiencing, but the wholesale adoption does bring a downside – as more and more capability is moved to the cloud, more and more cloud providers are utilized since, for the most part, each provider offers only a limited suite of services. The MultiCloud environment that creates a new set of challenges that IT leaders need to overcome, notably resiliency, interoperability/integration, and security and compliance through careful planning and the lessons learned from building complex on premise distributed systems.

Takeaways:

  • As enterprises move to the cloud, MultiCloud environments will increasingly become the norm, not the exception
  • Consistent planning and thoughtful architecture will be essential to efficient and effective cloud deployments
  • IT leaders do not need to be alarmed, they’ve been down the complex environment path before, but they do need to be careful
 

12:05 pm - 12:35 pm

Executive Exchange

 

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Think Tank

From the Trenches to the Clouds

The cloud is becoming an increasingly important tool in the toolkit of both IT and the business, whether it be plain-Jane Infrastructure as a Service or highly specialized Software as a Service and as a result is being broadly adopted. However, while provisioning a Cloud service might be a simple as a call and a credit card, successful implementation is a different matter all-together and a variety of factors need to be taken into account. To be successful you need to start early, building an adoption plan, selecting the most appropriate solution, managing the implementation with an eye to all the moving parts, and managing the ongoing relationship forcefully but fairly. Place a single step wrong and the benefit and value can be severely compromised.

Takeaways:

  • Without a solid up-front plan, any cloud implementation is going to be, if not doomed to failure, at least doomed to limited success
  • Successful cloud migration means paying attention to technical (how do you integrate apps? Data?) and non-technical (what happens to staff when roles change?) issues alike
  • Hurdles don’t disappear at go-live and ongoing effort is required to ensure early success are sustained throughout the life of the deployment

Call for Speakers

 

12:40 pm - 1:40 pm

Networking Luncheon


 

1:45 pm - 2:15 pm

Executive Exchange

 

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Think Tank

The Cloudy Future of the Energy Industry

By now there can be no doubt that the cloud is here to stay. Whether SaaS, PaaS, IaaS, public, private, or hybrid, cloud is fast becoming the de facto computing platform for dynamic businesses. However, while the cost benefits, flexibility benefits, and opportunity benefits are clear, there continue to be a number of hurdles that can limit adoption, chief among them regulatory compliance. For the oil and gas industry, one that is notably overseen by significant regulation, these challenges are slowing adoption of the cloud for production workloads. As the business case becomes ever more compelling though, energy sector IT leaders will have to find a way to make the cloud work for them.

Takeaways:

  • Cloud computing offers the potential of tremendous benefit to enterprise most notably by reducing costs and increasing flexibility
  • Cloud is not all benefits though and technological development has outstripped regulatory oversight leaving regulated industries in a quandary as to how to proceed
  • The benefits of cloud are too significant to ignore however and smart CIOs need to find a way to leverage the power of the cloud while simultaneously minimizing its stormy side

Call for Speakers

 

2:20 pm - 2:50 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Thought Leadership

Exploring the Cloudy Future of Platform as a Service

The three core forms of Cloud are Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), Platform as a Service (PaaS), and Software as a Service (SaaS). SaaS jumped out of the gate to a quick lead in terms of enterprise adoption, and continues to hold a dominant position in the delivery model wars. IaaS took a little longer to get up a head of steam, particularly for production deployments, but the allaying of resiliency, security, and compliance concerns has allowed it to begin to push more to the forefront. Left in the dust is PaaS with scuffling adoption rates, with the situation only posed to become worse as IaaS providers begin to offer solutions that squeeze upwards from the bottom of the stack, and SaaS providers offer ones that squeeze down from the top. As IT leaders build out the comprehensive cloud strategy, they need to give serious thought to the viability of their current and future PaaS investments. PaaS has a future to be sure, but does it have a future in your enterprise?

Takeaways:

  • Truly understanding the differences between IaaS, PaaS, and SaaS is essential to making an informed decision as to where each fits in corporate cloud strategy
  • The growth and development of the various cloud offerings has put the squeeze on “man-in-the-middle” PaaS offerings
  • PaaS solutions offer value and benefit to those organizations that are positioned to leverage their unique benefits and shouldn’t be ignored simply because they are less popular at the moment
 

2:55 pm - 3:25 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Roundtable

Horizontal or Vertical? Finding the Right Cloud Fit

The vast majority of cloud services available on the market today are best described as horizontal offerings – the same feature set and functionalities offered to each enterprise regardless of the different market pressures those enterprises face. But “one-size-fits-all” horizontal offerings are not the only way in which cloud can be consumed because businesses aren’t one-size-fits-all in their individuals needs and approaches to their market spaces. As a result, vertical cloud offerings are increasingly coming to market. These solutions differ from private clouds in that they don’t offer that truly individual level of customization, instead providing a “one-size-fits-some” approach. The advantages of such an approach (semi-custom offering without the semi-custom pricing primarily) can make these solutions seem appealing, but IT leaders must determine whether the inherent risk of a smaller and more niche focused solution offsets the benefit of a more tailored and less generic offering.

Takeaways:

  • Vertical cloud offerings have existed since the beginning of the cloud but simply have not been as popular as the larger horizontal solutions on the market
  • Vertical offerings can be tremendously thin (focused) allowing them to be incredibly deep (tailored) but offerings generally come from smaller providers
  • The big boys are starting to take notice of vertical specialization and push into this market making partner selection confusing
 

3:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Roundtable

Ensuring Cloud Portability

As human beings we all know that sooner or later, most relationships end, and the same of course is true for IT department – cloud service provider agreements. When human relationships (whether personal or business in nature) end, we can easily move into new ones because the “interfaces” with the new “service provider” remain consistent with those of the old, but when it comes to cloud-based systems, the same cannot necessarily be said. Portability can be hampered by many factors at the data (differing data models), application (differing programming languages), platform (differing operating systems), or even infrastructure (differing stacks) layer and all of these inconsistencies must be taken into account when establishing a cloud relationship. While IT departments may not be able to jump cloud to cloud to cloud, they can ensure at least a base level of portability by ensuring interoperability between cloud platforms and internal systems so that at the very least capabilities can be repatriated.

Takeaways:

  • Like a marriage with a pre-nup, cloud service relationships must be entered into with an eye on a potential future exit
  • All aspects of the cloud stack must be considered from an interoperability and portability perspective; any one could undermine future movement
  • Planning for repatriation is the easiest way to ensure portability because only one interoperability pairing is required for each cloud relationship – that between the provider and you
 

4:05 pm - 4:35 pm

Executive Exchange

 

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Think Tank

Cloud SLAs: Making, Measuring, and Managing

The lifeblood of any cloud relationship is the Service Level Agreement (SLA) upon which it is based – the SLA sets the expectations of both parties and acts as the roadmap for change, whether planned or unplanned. Each SLA has a complex lifecycle that includes three distinct phases – negotiation where the original terms of the agreement are established, measurement where service is actively monitored to ensure agreed upon levels are achieved, and management where deficiencies from and adjustments to initial agreements are acted upon. IT Leaders must take an active role in all phases of the SLA lifecycle to ensure optimal protection for their enterprise.

Takeaways:

  • Without strong SLAs, cloud service level agreements aren’t worth the paper they are written on
  • While many cloud vendors offer only a standard SLA, effort should always be invested in attempting to negotiate an appropriate set of terms
  • SLA work does not end with the negotiation of acceptable terms, in fact that is when the real work begins of ensuring SLA compliance

Call for Speakers

 

4:40 pm - 5:20 pm

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Executive Visions

Shadow IT – To Embrace or Eliminate?

Best practice in most enterprises, at least as far as the CIO and CISO goes, is to squash Shadow IT wherever it is encountered. Shadow IT, the argument goes, leads to a world of data and integration problems for the IT department, and significant amounts of unknown and unquantifiable risk for the information security group. A small but vocal minority however is beginning to advocate for Shadow IT as a catalyst of innovation, citing the increases in productivity and creativity by allowing enterprise staff to find their own out of the box solutions to organizational problems. CISOs can allow their organizations to have their cake (Shadow IT) and eat it too (still be secure) by following a few simple steps that allow them to build in security regardless of user activity.

Takeaways:

  • Shadow IT is not malicious activity; it is simply the Line of Business user community looking to be efficient and effective
  • A well-developed security program can take Shadow IT into account and incorporate protection mechanisms that allow end user flexibility
  • Embracing Shadow IT does not mean “no holds barred” and end users need to understand the limit of the boundaries and the reason for their existence
 

5:20 pm - 6:30 pm

Cocktail Reception

 

6:30 pm - 8:00 pm

Networking Dinner

 

8:00 pm - 10:00 pm

After Dinner Networking

 

Tuesday, November 8, 2016 - CIO Cloud Summit

7:00 am - 8:00 am

Networking Breakfast

 

8:10 am - 8:50 am

Keynote Presentation

The Role of the CIO: Business Challenger, Innovation Driver

Since the inception of the role, the focus of the CIO has primarily been one of Technologist and IT Operations Manager; selecting the tools and services necessary to support the business, and then efficiently and effectively operating them. This is a future of declining organizational value however as technology becomes increasingly democratized and other organizational groups take control over individual systems and data sets. CIOs need to recast themselves instead as Strategists and Business Innovators; leveraging their unique position at the crux of the organization to propose alternatives to the accepted way of doing things, and to drive organizational growth through business alignment and organizational change.

Takeaways:

  • CIO’s are at a fork in the road; they can continue to be Operational or evolve and become Transformational
  • Transformation efforts cannot stop at the boundaries of the IT department, they must reach into the business as a whole, addressing process and defining new capability
  • Visionary CIOs will move their departments from cost centers to value creators, and move themselves from executive afterthoughts to true organization leaders
 

8:55 am - 9:35 am

Keynote Presentation

Implementing Business Simplification for Success and Growth

Organizational complexity is the single most significant impediment that enterprises are dealing with today; it underlies every business problem enterprises faces and undermines every effort to address them. Organizational complexity is grounded in cumbersome processes, but those poor processes exist only because enterprise applications themselves, including those that are customer facing, as well as those that are not, are complex and unwieldy. To address cultural complexity then, enterprises must eliminate the complexity in their application suite by either building new, buying new, or more efficiently simplifying what they already have. Only by simplification can enterprises eliminate complexity in an efficient and effective way and position themselves for success.

Takeaways:

  • Enterprises live and breath by the speed with which regular transactions occur – turning these into one minute transactions is the key to success
  • Complexity must be eliminated in all applications customer-facing, core internal, and internal supporting alike
  • Building or buying new, less complex applications offers limited gains because eventually all introduce complexities of their own; only simplified applications offer long term, sustained elimination of complexity
 

9:45 am - 10:15 am

Executive Exchange

 

Think Tank

Cloud Cost Containment

Perhaps the single biggest value purported from the cloud is that of cost reduction, the opportunity to drive down sky-high IT costs to either meet mandated spending reductions or to channel freed up funds into innovation and growth initiatives. With monthly per-user pricing, businesses avoid huge capital outlays, but the pricing models are so divergent from what IT departments are used to that it isn’t always easy to determine whether they advertised savings actually measure up, and in surveys respondents rarely indicate their savings were everything they expected them to be. To be able to determine just how cost effective cloud solutions are, CIOs need first to calculate the true per-user cost of alternate solutions, including those already in place.

Takeaways:

  • Cloud solutions generally do deliver savings, as up to 80% of survey respondents indicate, but rarely at the levels advertised and promised
  • For an apples to apples comparison, it is essential to know the cost of service of solutions already in place, as well as cloud alternatives
  • Cost containment also means limiting cloud sprawl as well; over-provisioning through uncontrolled growth can rapidly erode any potential savings
 

10:20 am - 10:50 am

Executive Exchange

 

Thought Leadership

Application Integration and the Impact of the Cloud

While applications exist, in general, to perform a specific pre-defined function or purpose, rarely do they operate independently and indeed significant IT resources have been expended over the years integrating applications to allow them to work together. With an ever-greater push to the cloud comes a change to how application integration is handled. Firstly, cloud delivered applications tend to be far more siloed than fuller on-prem application suites, meaning significantly more of them, and therefore significantly more integrations between them exist. Secondly, the distributed nature of cloud-based applications introduces more system latency requiring a switch from synchronous to asynchronous communications that requires a radically different integration approach.

Takeaways:

  • Moving to the cloud does not eliminate IT’s need to focus on application integration and likely actually increases it
  • There is significant risk that IT will be required to integrate after the fact, after the business has already provisioned cloud systems
  • Integrating application in the cloud requires a different approach to integration and IT departments may need to familiarize themselves with new skills
 

10:55 am - 11:25 am

Executive Exchange

 

Roundtable


Sponsored by:

IBM View details

 
 
 

11:30 am - 12:00 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Roundtable

Overcoming Cloud Data Integration Challenges

As enterprise applications becoming increasingly distributed as a result of broader cloud adoption, so too will enterprise data stores become increasingly distributed. While this presents general data management issues, of particular importance is the challenge of data integration in the cloud. Though ETL type processing continues to be a viable method of integrating data, the siloed nature of cloud application deployments radically increases the number of transactions required to consistently aggregate and integrate enterprise data. Add to this the fact that most existing ETL tools are optimized to work between relational databases, while many cloud solutions are based on NoSQL structures and may be required to migrate data through intermediary “staging” platforms. As transaction volume increases exponentially, so does bandwidth usage and bandwidth cost and so CIO’s need to work hard to control this spiral while facilitated clean integration.

Takeaways:

  • While latency is a big problem for cloud application integration, it is far less of an issue for cloud data integration
  • Existing data integration tools and processes will continue to work in the short term in a cloud focused world, but transaction volume ultimately will erode savings
  • As platform diversity increases data integration can become increasingly complex and so alternate tools and techniques will be required to tie everything together
 

12:05 pm - 12:45 pm

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Executive Visions

Diversity in IT

The importance technology plays within an enterprise will only continue to gain momentum as more developers, engineers, and programmers enter the workforce. As these segments continue to grow, so does the diversity of the workforce within the technology field. For a field that is severely constrained by a talent and skills gap, this influx of bodies can only be a good thing. Beyond the basic ability to deliver of identified capabilities a diverse workforce, whether cultural or gender influenced offers a whole that is more than the sum of the parts. Finding ways to drive and increase diversity in IT then should be a key focus for every IT executive.

Takeaways:

  • Identify the importance behind diversity in technology, opportunities, and capabilities
  • Discuss the importance of cultivating diversity at the grass-roots level and building post-secondary programs that drive awareness of and interest in IT
  • Understand the hurdles that exist that limit the prevalence of diversity in IT, and what steps must be taken to lower, if not eliminate, them
 

12:45 pm - 12:55 pm

Thank You Address and Closing Remarks

 

1:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Grab and Go Luncheon

 

1:30 pm - 2:00 pm

Shuttle-Bus to Golf Tournament

 

2:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Nine-Hole Golf Tournament

 

5:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Shuttle-Bus back from Golf Tournament

 

5:30 pm - 6:30 pm

Networking Cocktail Reception

 

6:30 pm - 8:00 pm

Networking Dinner

 

8:00 pm - 10:00 pm

After Dinner Networking