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CIO Cloud Summit
November 10-11, 2015

↓ Agenda Key

View detailsKeynote Presentation

Visionary speaker presents to entire audience on key issues, challenges and business opportunities

View detailsExecutive Visions

Panel moderated by Master of Ceremonies and headed by four executives discussing critical business topics

View detailsThought Leadership

Solution provider-led session giving high-level overview of opportunities

View detailsThink Tank

End user-led session in boardroom style, focusing on best practices

View detailsRoundtable

Interactive session led by a moderator, focused on industry issue

View detailsExecutive Exchange

Pre-determined, one-on-one interaction revolving around solutions of interest

View detailsFocus Group

Discussion of business drivers within a particular industry area

View detailsAnalyst Q&A Session

Moderator-led coverage of the latest industry research

View detailsVendor Showcase

Several brief, pointed overviews of the newest solutions and services

View detailsCase Study

Overview of recent project successes and failures

View detailsOpen Forum Luncheon

Informal discussions on pre-determined topics

View detailsNetworking Session

Unique activities at once relaxing, enjoyable and productive

Tuesday, November 10, 2015 - CIO Cloud Summit

12:00 pm
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1:30 pm

Registration and Greeting

1:30 pm
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1:40 pm

Welcome Address and Opening Remarks

1:40 pm
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2:25 pm

Keynote Presentation

Exploring the Cloudy Future of Platform as a Service

The three core forms of Cloud are Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), Platform as a Service (PaaS), and Software as a Service (SaaS). SaaS jumped out of the gate to a quick lead in terms of enterprise adoption, and continues to hold a dominant position in the delivery model wars. IaaS took a little longer to get up a head of steam, particularly for production deployments, but the allaying of resiliency, security, and compliance concerns has allowed it to begin to push more to the forefront. Left in the dust is PaaS with scuffling adoption rates, with the situation only posed to become worse as IaaS providers begin to offer solutions that squeeze upwards from the bottom of the stack, and SaaS providers offer ones that squeeze down from the top. As IT leaders build out the comprehensive cloud strategy, they need to give serious thought to the viability of their current and future PaaS investments. PaaS has a future to be sure, but does it have a future in your enterprise?

Takeaways:

  • Truly understanding the differences between IaaS, PaaS, and SaaS is essential to making an informed decision as to where each fits in corporate cloud strategy
  • The growth and development of the various cloud offerings has put the squeeze on “man-in-the-middle” PaaS offerings
  • PaaS solutions offer value and benefit to those organizations that are positioned to leverage their unique benefits and shouldn’t be ignored simply because they are less popular at the moment

2:35 pm
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3:05 pm

Executive Exchange

Thought Leadership


Sponsored by:

View detailsDimension DataDimension Data

3:10 pm
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3:40 pm

Executive Exchange

Think Tank

Cloudy with a Chance of Breaches

Cloud delivered computing services, whether Software, Platform, or Infrastructure as a Service offer the potential of significant business advantages such as reduced cost and increased flexibility. These advantages however come with very real risks, chief among them security concerns and the risk of data and compliance breaches – how do you secure what you can’t see, touch, and control? Combining security solutions that are tied more closely to the data that is to be protected with more comprehensive monitoring and management platforms is the key to ensuring protection in a world where the cloud simply cannot be ignored.

Takeaways:

  • Be exposed to the true security and compliance cloud threat landscape
  • Learn how successful cloud adopters have mitigated these risks
  • Discover how to build cloud protection capabilities keyed to you needs

Think Tank

IT Integration in a Distributed IT World

It’s no secret – the integration of disparate systems, disparate applications, and disparate data stores has long been one of the biggest challenges faced by the IT department. Simply put, getting everything to talk to everything is no easy task. The rapid adoption of cloud delivered services has compounded this problem almost exponentially – if it was hard to integrate when you controlled the whole stack it has become nearly impossible when you control very little of it. To be efficient and effective IT departments need to adopt a new model of system, application, and data integration. Endless webs of one-off point-to-point integrations simply won’t cut it anymore and a purposeful, structured approach is required.

Takeaways:

  • Learn how to build a holistic strategy to integrate systems, applications, and data
  • Understand how to leverage SOA and ESB to streamline app to app communications
  • Discover the power and impact of holistic Master Data Management and other data integration processes.

3:45 pm
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4:00 pm

Networking Break

4:05 pm
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4:35 pm

Executive Exchange

Think Tank

Embrace the Cloud: Adopting a Brokerage Model

The allure of the Cloud is three-fold: the widely seen benefits are reduced cost, increased flexibility, and enhanced time to market. As a result business are rushing to the Cloud in ever increasing droves. In many cases, however, the rush is omitting the IT department until it is too late, and the specter of incompatible data and communications standards, of an inability to integrate with existing on-premise systems hangs over these deployments. To combat these issues, IT leaders need to recognize the value provided by the Cloud and develop a brokerage model whereby IT can direct business peers to the right Cloud delivered service.

Takeaways:

  • Learn what the benefits of the cloud are, and why estimates are being missed
  • Understand the drivers of these misses and why they are a problem
  • Determine the best approach for IT to take to head those problems off while offering an even higher level of service and value

Think Tank

Using Cloud Delivered Services to Enable Business Transformation

As IT leaders begin to make the Cloud an inherent component of their long-term plans, they face the risk of falling into old habits and simply approaching the Cloud from a purely tech-centric perspective. While addressing the technology questions presented by increased Cloud adoption is important, more important is understanding the business enablement opportunities offered by broader Cloud adoption strategies. Innovative CIOs will need to see the Cloud for what it is; a way to change the conversation and focus away from the bits and bytes to an evaluation of what capability enables optimized business initiatives.

Takeaways:

  • Learn why viewing the Cloud as an alternate technology delivery channel only is career suicide
  • Understand the real value of the Cloud, and that it goes beyond surface metrics like cost savings
  • Develop, instead of a Cloud adoption strategy, a Cloud/Business enablement strategy

4:40 pm
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5:10 pm

Executive Exchange

Thought Leadership

Cloud Computing as a Transformational Business Enabler

Many CIOs have already put in place strategies and plans for cloud computing, however as enterprises grow and adapt to new market pressures it is time to forget the hype and look at where cloud technologies will not only transform the delivery of IT services but also enable new ways of conducting business. Seamless delivery of, and access to services and information on a global level will be a basic requirement of cloud based IT but as important if not more so will be the ability for cloud to enable the use of new technologies such as mobile, social and big data.

5:15 pm
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6:15 pm

Executive Visions

Cloud Computing is about Business

The pressure is on for the CIO to adopt and adapt; through all the conversations, there are still unanswered questions. There is one key question about cloud computing that is still unanswered, but an answer is required to move things forward. 'Is the discussion regarding cloud computing a technical discussion, a financial discussion or a business discussion?' The dialogs within every organization are circular in nature and seem never ending. The core issue is that the technology and the financial components are moving targets. It is time to change the focus and push the conversation towards business and results? Topics like innovation, agility and skills are much more relevant, no? 

This executive panel discussion will cover topics where business is the real focus of cloud computing - and bring the technology into the conversation where it makes the most sense to you and your business.

6:15 pm
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7:00 pm

Cocktail Reception

7:00 pm
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8:30 pm

Networking Dinner

8:30 pm
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10:00 pm

After Dinner Networking

Wednesday, November 11, 2015 - CIO Cloud Summit

7:00 am
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8:00 am

Networking Breakfast

8:10 am
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8:55 am

Opening Keynote Presentation

Planning for a MultiCloud Future

The promise of the cloud is almost beyond compare; infinite computing resources, unmatched reliability and uptime, instantaneous service availability, simplistic self-service and provisioning, and the low-low prices of a “buy by the drink” model. These are the reasons behind the rush to the cloud that we are currently experiencing, but the wholesale adoption does bring a downside – as more and more capability is moved to the cloud, more and more cloud providers are utilized since, for the most part, each provider offers only a limited suite of services. The MultiCloud environment that creates a new set of challenges that IT leaders need to overcome, notably resiliency, interoperability/integration, and security and compliance through careful planning and the lessons learned from building complex on premise distributed systems.

Takeaways:

  • As enterprises move to the cloud, MultiCloud environments will increasingly become the norm, not the exception
  • Consistent planning and thoughtful architecture will be essential to efficient and effective cloud deployments
  • IT leaders do not need to be alarmed, they’ve been down the complex environment path before, but they do need to be careful

9:05 am
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9:35 am

Executive Exchange

Thought Leadership

Overcoming Cloud Data Integration Challenges

As enterprise applications becoming increasingly distributed as a result of broader cloud adoption, so too will enterprise data stores become increasingly distributed. While this presents general data management issues, of particular importance is the challenge of data integration in the cloud. Though ETL type processing continues to be a viable method of integrating data, the siloed nature of cloud application deployments radically increases the number of transactions required to consistently aggregate and integrate enterprise data. Add to this the fact that most existing ETL tools are optimized to work between relational databases, while many cloud solutions are based on NoSQL structures and may be required to migrate data through intermediary “staging” platforms. As transaction volume increases exponentially, so does bandwidth usage and bandwidth cost and so CIO’s need to work hard to control this spiral while facilitated clean integration.

Takeaways:

  • While latency is a big problem for cloud application integration, it is far less of an issue for cloud data integration
  • Existing data integration tools and processes will continue to work in the short term in a cloud focused world, but transaction volume ultimately will erode savings
  • As platform diversity increases data integration can become increasingly complex and so alternate tools and techniques will be required to tie everything together

9:40 am
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10:10 am

Executive Exchange

Think Tank

Is Security Obscuring the Benefit of the Cloud?

Cloud delivered computing services, whether Software, Platform, or Infrastructure as a Service offer the potential of significant business advantages such as reduced cost and increased flexibility. These advantages however come with very real risks, chief among them security concerns and the risk of data and compliance breaches – how do you secure what you can’t see, touch, and control? Join our panel as we explore both the security and compliance issues inherent in Cloud deployments, look at the hidden issues that first time Cloud adopters may simply not be aware of, and discuss through solutions that can be used to address these challenges and allow enterprises to fully and firmly embrace the Cloud.

Takeaways:

  • Be exposed to the true security and compliance cloud threat landscape
  • Learn how successful cloud adopters have mitigated these risks
  • Discover how to build cloud protection capabilities keyed to you needs

Think Tank

CIOs & Attaining Better Personnel in a Critical Infrastructure World

According to a recent study, more than 75% of CIOs are confident in the growth that their companies are expected to face in the near future. In the same study, more than 50% of CIOs are confident in the amount of IT projects that their companies will likely invest in, within the next several months. Theres no doubt that the tech industry is expanding, yet its still the priority of the CIO to find the best talent available, particularly in the specialty areas, as a way to acquire top personnel and contend with the competition.

This session will examine current talent acquisition issues that face CIOs across all industries, such as:

  • Recruiting & Growth Management
  • Better Training and Certification 
  • Staff Sourcing & Retention
  • Improving Your Current Team
  • Prepping for Future Challenges 

10:15 am
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10:30 am

Networking Break

10:35 am
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11:05 am

Executive Exchange

Thought Leadership

Ensuring Cloud Portability

As human beings we all know that sooner or later, most relationships end, and the same of course is true for IT department – cloud service provider agreements. When human relationships (whether personal or business in nature) end, we can easily move into new ones because the “interfaces” with the new “service provider” remain consistent with those of the old, but when it comes to cloud-based systems, the same cannot necessarily be said. Portability can be hampered by many factors at the data (differing data models), application (differing programming languages), platform (differing operating systems), or even infrastructure (differing stacks) layer and all of these inconsistencies must be taken into account when establishing a cloud relationship. While IT departments may not be able to jump cloud to cloud to cloud, they can ensure at least a base level of portability by ensuring interoperability between cloud platforms and internal systems so that at the very least capabilities can be repatriated.

Takeaways:

  • Like a marriage with a pre-nup, cloud service relationships must be entered into with an eye on a potential future exit
  • All aspects of the cloud stack must be considered from an interoperability and portability perspective; any one could undermine future movement
  • Planning for repatriation is the easiest way to ensure portability because only one interoperability pairing is required for each cloud relationship – that between the provider and you

11:10 am
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11:40 pm

Executive Exchange

Think Tank

The Role of the Cloud in IoT Deployments

Though cloud has been loosely defined by many users as vendors alike as “not here” computing, the base definition for “true” cloud includes elasticity, dynamic allocation, and multi-tenancy as de facto capabilities. Given that IoT type deployments, by their very definition, are dynamic is usage pattern, highly variable in demand, and encompassing of thousands of individual users or tenants, we can see that IoT workloads are perhaps the ultimate expression of cloud workloads. As a result and serious effort at developing IoT based solutions must be making use of cloud based storage and compute capabilities, not to mention on-demand software solutions in order to extract maximum value. Cloud may have started as a way of providing greater efficiency and flexibility for traditional computing paradigms, but may well find its true calling in enabling IoT computing paradigms instead.

Takeaways:

  • In many ways cloud computing will become the backbone of IoT computing
  • Those organizations that have not yet embraced the cloud, or have done so only in a tentative manner, put themselves at a significant disadvantage in the race to an IoT future compared to their more cloud-savvy peers
  • Embracing the cloud requires significant process changes at the backend in terms of governance, etc. Now is the time to build that new cloud foundation

Think Tank

eDiscovery and the Impact of the Cloud

eDiscovery is a complicated process at the best of times but we have collectively been aware of it for sufficient time that at least base processes have been put in place to search through local storage should litigation require it. The advent of cloud-delivered services however has introduced a wrinkle, or rather two, that few have prepared for and that potentially complicates the ediscovery process; can you perform ediscovery against the cloud solutions you have procured, and can you perform ediscovery against the cloud solutions (such as social media) you haven’t but are using regardless? To be ready for cloud focused ediscovery means knowing where your data is, knowing how you can access it, and having a plan that spells out the process.

Takeaways:

  • Neither cloud providers nor the legal professionals opposing you is going to makes things things easy on your so you have to invest in the legwork up front
  • Ensuring that you are asking the right questions of cloud vendors up front is the best thing you can do to prepare for future litigation
  • Keeping an eye on rogue departments and individuals to make sure you actually know what cloud data you have is also a strong step in the right direction

11:45 am
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12:15 pm

Executive Exchange

Roundtable

Innovation in Sourcing Delivery

The convergence of Social, Mobile, Analytics, and Cloud is creating enormous opportunity for companies, and changing the way that services are delivered and consumed. These technologies are even having an impact on traditional sourcing models, which are evolving to meet new client requirements and to deliver on desired business outcomes. Best of breed partners need to invest heavily in capabilities such as analytics and automation to allow them to deliver unmatched services, tailored to each client’s specific needs and environment.

Takeaways:

  • To help client organizations become transformative, sourcing partners must become transformational themselves
  • Sourcing partners must be prepared and able to ingrate with and extend out to cloud and mobile environments for service delivery
  • Beyond delivery models, innovative partners must provide innovative services and must deliver those services in innovative ways

Roundtable

Disrupting Markets with Disruptive Technologies

While the combination of Social, Mobile, Analytics, and Cloud have been present and disrupting IT departments and enterprises as a whole for over two years now, in many ways organizations have still not fully embraced them, have still not fully leveraged them. These new platforms allow organizations radically new ways to go to market, allowing for broad scale deployment of “systems of engagement” that create dynamic relationships with clients and prospects. Finding the resources, wherewithal, and ability to fully commit to these technologies and the capabilities they create has proven to be a struggle for many, but a struggle that can be overcome by leveraging the right partners that bring the right skills and experiences to bear.

Takeaways:

  • Social, Mobile, Analytics, and Cloud are all here to stay; each one adds value to enterprises but collectively that value increases exponentially
  • The manner in which these technologies are implemented, operated, and utilized is different than the foregoing systems of record we are used to
  • Unique skills and capabilities are required to leverage the power and value of these platforms, skills and capabilities that can be in short supply

12:20 pm
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12:50 pm

Executive Exchange

Thought Leadership

Cloud Cost Containment

Perhaps the single biggest value purported from the cloud is that of cost reduction, the opportunity to drive down sky-high IT costs to either meet mandated spending reductions or to channel freed up funds into innovation and growth initiatives. With monthly per-user pricing, businesses avoid huge capital outlays, but the pricing models are so divergent from what IT departments are used to that it isn’t always easy to determine whether they advertised savings actually measure up, and in surveys respondents rarely indicate their savings were everything they expected them to be. To be able to determine just how cost effective cloud solutions are, CIOs need first to calculate the true per-user cost of alternate solutions, including those already in place.

Takeaways:

  • Cloud solutions generally do deliver savings, as up to 80% of survey respondents indicate, but rarely at the levels advertised and promised
  • For an apples to apples comparison, it is essential to know the cost of service of solutions already in place, as well as cloud alternatives
  • Cost containment also means limiting cloud sprawl as well; over-provisioning through uncontrolled growth can rapidly erode any potential savings

12:55 pm
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1:55 pm

Networking Luncheon

2:00 pm
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2:30 pm

Executive Exchange

Think Tank

The Evolution of the Private Cloud

Once upon a time applications ran directly on physical hardware. Then the boxes got bigger and more capable and multiple applications were run on the same hardware. There were some resource constraints, but things in general became more efficient. Time passed, things evolved and virtualization was introduced, allowing enterprises to run even more applications even more efficiently on the same hardware. And then the cloud came on the scene, extending the virtualization model to the point that it looked like something completely different, to the point that it became true utility computing. Cloud computing is not just “virtualization on a bigger scale” and as CIOs prepare their organizations to dive into private clouds at an increasing rate, it is very important to understand what they are and are not, and how they differ from their forbear computer models with which we are all familiar.

Takeaways:

  • Private clouds are big and becoming bigger, but calling something a private cloud and having it actually be one are different things
  • While virtualization may be a core enabling technology of a private cloud, virtualizing an environment doesn’t make it a cloud
  • True private clouds have both pros and cons in relation to other compute models; they are not the be-all and end-all and careful consideration needs to be given before pushing ahead with private cloud deployment

Think Tank

The Confounding Case of Cloudwashing

Since the advent of cloud delivered technologies, just a few short years ago, they have become a significant contributor to enterprise success, and as a result have gained significant visibility and notoriety in the marketplace. That popularity and visibility has lead to the phenomenon of “cloudwashing”, or applying the cloud moniker to non-cloud solutions and services to piggyback on true cloud’s success. Cloudwashing is extremely common, whether it be a managed hosting arrangement positioned as IaaS, or web-apps purported to be SaaS, vendors are only too happy to promote these solutions, and executives are only too happy to implement them. This begs and important question; if these so-called cloud solutions aren’t, and everyone knows they aren’t, why is it that we are collectively so happy with them? This session will explore the cloudwashing phenomenon and as the difficult question “what is it that people REALLY want out of the cloud?”

Takeaways:

  • True cloud (multi-tenant, elastic, on-demand, self-service, pay-as-you-go computing) has huge benefits and is here to stay
  • Cloudwashing is more about enterprise inability to adopt the cloud than it is about vendors confounding the marketplace
  • Cloud requires enterprises to fundamentally shift how they think, work, and act; that level of culture change is hard to achieve but the work is essential

2:35 pm
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3:05 pm

Executive Exchange

Roundtable

Horizontal or Vertical? Finding the Right Cloud Fit

The vast majority of cloud services available on the market today are best described as horizontal offerings – the same feature set and functionalities offered to each enterprise regardless of the different market pressures those enterprises face. But “one-size-fits-all” horizontal offerings are not the only way in which cloud can be consumed because businesses aren’t one-size-fits-all in their individuals needs and approaches to their market spaces. As a result, vertical cloud offerings are increasingly coming to market. These solutions differ from private clouds in that they don’t offer that truly individual level of customization, instead providing a “one-size-fits-some” approach. The advantages of such an approach (semi-custom offering without the semi-custom pricing primarily) can make these solutions seem appealing, but IT leaders must determine whether the inherent risk of a smaller and more niche focused solution offsets the benefit of a more tailored and less generic offering.

Takeaways:

  • Vertical cloud offerings have existed since the beginning of the cloud but simply have not been as popular as the larger horizontal solutions on the market
  • Vertical offerings can be tremendously thin (focused) allowing them to be incredibly deep (tailored) but offerings generally come from smaller providers
  • The big boys are starting to take notice of vertical specialization and push into this market making partner selection confusing

Roundtable

Regulatory Impacts of a Cloud Computing Model

Cloud computing is the new, hot method for delivering enterprise-grade computing capability. It does so efficiently and cost effectively and allows businesses to be quicker to market, to more nimble in their responses, and to do so with greater fiscal constraint. What Cloud cannot do however is allow enterprises to stay on the right side of archaic and slow-moving government and industry regulations because the technology moves forward far quicker than the regulations can. In this environment, CIOs need to proceed cautiously to ensure they are not putting their enterprises at risk as they embrace the technology they need to move it forward.

Takeaways:

  • Understanding the regulatory landscape is essential for any CIO that is investing in “not here” technologies like the cloud
  • Every enterprise is different and its regulatory exposure is different – prepare to make friends with the legal department or seek outside assistance as needed
  • Don’t let regulation scare you off of the cloud however; the value and benefits are tangible

3:10 pm
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3:40 pm

Executive Exchange

Thought Leadership

Cloud SLAs: Making, Measuring, and Managing

The lifeblood of any cloud relationship is the Service Level Agreement (SLA) upon which it is based – the SLA sets the expectations of both parties and acts as the roadmap for change, whether planned or unplanned. Each SLA has a complex lifecycle that includes three distinct phases – negotiation where the original terms of the agreement are established, measurement where service is actively monitored to ensure agreed upon levels are achieved, and management where deficiencies from and adjustments to initial agreements are acted upon. IT Leaders must take an active role in all phases of the SLA lifecycle to ensure optimal protection for their enterprise.

Takeaways:

  • Without strong SLAs, cloud service level agreements aren’t worth the paper they are written on
  • While many cloud vendors offer only a standard SLA, effort should always be invested in attempting to negotiate an appropriate set of terms
  • SLA work does not end with the negotiation of acceptable terms, in fact that is when the real work begins of ensuring SLA compliance

3:45 pm
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4:00 pm

Networking Break

4:05 pm
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4:35 pm

Executive Exchange

Think Tank

Private Cloud Done Two Ways

“Cloud” in and of itself is a nebulous term, applying to a variety of different compute models and nowhere is this more obvious that when it comes to private clouds specifically. On the one hand we have private clouds that are complete cloud stacks that are wholly owned by an organization, are managed by the IT department of the organization, and exist within facilities owned or managed by the organization. On the other we have a privatized segment of a public cloud offering that implements fixed boundaries around the limits of the assigned cloud space and ensures that no sharing of data load occurs, that unique SLAs exist, and that distinct management is in place. While both in some way break the core tenets of what “cloud” is (multi-tenancy and dynamic provisioning among them), private clouds are popular and becoming more so. It is essential therefore that CIOs understand the difference between the two private clouds to make the right choice for their organization.

Takeaways:

  • Private clouds offer a distinct advantage over their public counterparts – a greater sense of security and a greater ease of achieving compliance
  • Private clouds offer a distinct disadvantage over their public counterparts – greater costs and greater management complexity
  • Picking the right private cloud will maximize benefit while minimizing detriment so it is essential that it be done right

Think Tank

Does OpenStack have the Legs for the Long Haul?

In many ways, OpenStack seems to be on a roll with revenues approaching a billion dollars and projected to double that within the next handful of years. Packed user conferences are occurring on both sides of the Atlantic and buzz generally seems high. Why is then that virtually every analyst firm is at best cautious and at worst pessimistic about OpenStack and it’s long term viability? The crux of the matter seems to be the interoperability between the OpenStack stack and the proprietary stacks that big name public cloud solution providers make use of. If the world truly is going hybrid, this integrations issue becomes critical for enterprise cloud success, and OpenStack long-term viability.

Takeaways:

  • OpenStack has shown tremendous growth and adoption and is supported by a healthy community
  • All may not be rosy however as adoption as the basis for commercial solutions is all but absent for a variety of reasons
  • In a hybrid cloud world, public and private clouds must integrate cleanly and efficiently, but will that option exist for OpenStack deployments?

4:40 pm
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5:10 pm

Executive Exchange

Thought Leadership

Application Integration and the Impact of the Cloud

While applications exist, in general, to perform a specific pre-defined function or purpose, rarely do they operate independently and indeed significant IT resources have been expended over the years integrating applications to allow them to work together. With an ever-greater push to the cloud comes a change to how application integration is handled. Firstly, cloud delivered applications tend to be far more siloed than fuller on-prem application suites, meaning significantly more of them, and therefore significantly more integrations between them exist. Secondly, the distributed nature of cloud-based applications introduces more system latency requiring a switch from synchronous to asynchronous communications that requires a radically different integration approach.

Takeaways:

  • Moving to the cloud does not eliminate IT’s need to focus on application integration and likely actually increases it
  • There is significant risk that IT will be required to integrate after the fact, after the business has already provisioned cloud systems
  • Integrating application in the cloud requires a different approach to integration and IT departments may need to familiarize themselves with new skills

5:15 pm
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6:15 pm

Executive Visions

Public, Private, Hybrid: Understanding the Pros and Cons

When it comes to a move to the cloud, enterprises have three very distinct options available to them (or two distinct options and a third that is the blend of the first two). Public clouds offer the potential of tremendous flexibility and unparalleled efficiency but come with question marks about security and resiliency. Private clouds directly address those concerns but bring far bigger price tags, both in terms of dollar cost and management requirements. On the surface hybrid clouds seem to offer the best of both worlds by marrying the best of public and private, and minimizing their worst. But this isn’t necessarily the case and in many ways hybrid can be seen as nothing more than a compromise solution that compromises all the benefits of the cloud. The key for enterprises when selecting a cloud model is to look at the big picture and build a strategy that leverages strengths, minimizes weaknesses, and is built for the long term.

Takeaways:

  • The promise of the public cloud lies in its flexibility, cost-effectiveness and ease of use but it brings with it a loss of control
  • Private clouds all but guarantee data privacy and protection but carry significantly bigger price tags and negative impacts of accessibility
  • Hybrid clouds allow enterprises to mix and match to get the right cost vs. security balance but ratchet management complexity up to all new levels

6:15 pm
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6:20 pm

Thank You Address and Closing Remarks

6:20 pm
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7:00 pm

Cocktail Reception

7:00 pm
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8:30 pm

Networking Dinner

8:30 pm
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10:00 pm

After Dinner Networking